The Rational Human Condition 1, Preface and General Introduction, Section 1.1–Bounded in a Nutshell.


THE RATIONAL HUMAN CONDITION, PART 1

PREFACE AND GENERAL INTRODUCTION

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section 1.0  What It Is

Section 1.1  Bounded in a Nutshell

Section 1.2  Rational Anthropology vs. Analytic Metaphysics, the Standard Picture, and Scientific Naturalism

Section 1.3  Philosophy and Its History: No Deep Difference

Section 1.4  Works of Philosophy vs. Philosophical Theories: Presentational Hylomorphism and Polymorphism

Section 1.5  Analytic Philosophy, Continental Philosophy, and Rational Anthropology

Section 1.6  What is a Rational Human Animal?

Section 1.7  An Important Worry and a Preliminary Reply

Section 1.8  The Biggest Windmills


In the fullness of time, The Rational Human Condition will also appear as a series of five e-books published by Rounded Globe, each of which, in turn, will be available in hard copy, on demand, from Out of House Publishing.


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THE RATIONAL HUMAN CONDITION, PART 1

PREFACE AND GENERAL INTRODUCTION

Section 1.1  Bounded in a Nutshell

Bounded in a nutshell, The Rational Human Condition is my attempt to do some real philosophy.

By “real philosophy” I mean authentic, serious philosophy, as opposed to inauthentic, superficial philosophy.

Authentic philosophy is committed, wholehearted philosophy pursued as a calling or vocation, and as a way of life; and inauthentic philosophy is professionalized, Scholastic, half-hearted philosophy, treated as a mere job or a mere “glass bead game.”

Serious philosophy is philosophy with critical, deep, and synoptic or wide-scope content; and superfical philosophy is philosophy with dogmatic, shallow, and narrow or trivial content.

In turn, I think that real philosophy is what I call rational anthropology.

In the 11th and most famous of his Theses on Feuerbach, Marx wrote that “philosophers have only interpreted the world in different ways; the point is to change it.”

I completely agree with him that the ultimate aim of philosophy is to change the world, not merely interpret it.

So Marx and I are both philosophical liberationists: that is, we both believe that philosophy should have radical political implications.[i]

But I also sharply disagree with him, insofar as I think that the primary aim of real philosophy, now understood as rational anthropology, and its practices of synoptic reflection, writing, teaching, and public conversation, is to change our lives.

Then, and only then, can we act upon the world in the right way.

NOTE

[i] See, e.g., R. Hanna, “Radical Enlightenment: Existential Kantian Cosmopolitan Anarchism, With a Concluding Quasi-Federalist Postscipt,” in D. Heidemann and K. Stoppenbrink (eds.), Join, Or Die: Philosophical Foundations of Federalism (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2016), pp. 63-90.


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